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Cell Therapeutics Says UW's Neuro-Oncology Program Begins Patient Enrolment

Cell Therapeutics, Inc. (CTIC) on Tuesday said the University of Washington's School of Medicine, Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Division of Neuro-Oncology has begun enrolling patients in a randomized phase II clinical study comparing the combination of OPAXIO (paclitaxel poliglumex, PPX, CT-2103) and radiation therapy, or RT, to the combination of temozolomide, or TMZ, and RT for patients with newly-diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

The study objective is to determine whether paclitaxel poliglumex and RT are likely to improve progression-free survival and overall survival compared to TMZ and RT. It will also evaluate neuro-cognitive function and toxicities of these therapies.

Glioblastoma multiforme or GBM is a poor-prognosis high-grade malignant brain tumor with an active gene called MGMT, which substantially decreases the effectiveness of standard therapy with TMZ.

This study is a multicenter trial initiated and led by the Neuro-Oncology department of the Brown University Oncology Research Group in Providence, Rhode Island. The first patient at UW recently has been enrolled.

by RTT Staff Writer

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