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Hamburger Hafen Und Logistik 2011 Profit After Tax Climbs - Quick Facts

Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG (HHULY.PK,HHULF.PK) said its 2011 profit after tax was up to 118.8 million euros from 113.9 million euros last year.

Earnings per share amounted to 1.20 euros for the listed Port Logistics subgroup in 2011, a year-over-year increase of 20.2 percent.

Revenue grew by 14.0 percent year-over-year to 1.22 billion euros. Container throughput rose 21.3 percent to 7.1 million standard containers, or TEU, while container transport went up 11.3 percent to 1.9 million TEU.

Klaus-Dieter Peters, Chairman of HHLA´s Executive Board, said, "...Given the growth in surplus capacity at the terminals of rival ports in Northern Europe, the difficult situation for container shipping as a whole and the protracted delay in the dredging of the river Elbe's navigation channel, this is a remarkable achievement."

Based on the events of the year to date and current market estimates, it is expected that 2012 will see a substantial decline in global economic growth and with it, a slowdown in global trade and container handling. Going forward, for the 2012 financial year, HHLA expects its container throughput, revenue and results to grow in the region of 5 percent.

Further, a proposal will be made at the 2011 Annual General Meeting to pay out a dividend of 0.65 euros per Class A share. This corresponds to a dividend pay-out ratio of 54.1 percent and an increase of 18.2 % compared with the previous year.

by RTT Staff Writer

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