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AstraZeneca Plans To Conduct New Study Of BRILINTA In PAD Patients

AstraZeneca Plc (AZN,AZN.L) unveiled plans to conduct the EUCLID study, a global clinical trial involving 11,500 patients with peripheral artery disease, or PAD, a condition affecting approximately 27 million people in Europe and North America. PAD patients are at high risk of myocardial infarction, strokes, and other health complications.

EUCLID is designed to evaluate cardiovascular event rate and safety in PAD patients. BRILINTA (Ticagrelor) is currently not approved for the treatment of patients with PAD.

EUCLID is a randomized, double-blind, parallel group, multi-center study evaluating the efficacy of ticagrelor (monotherapy) compared to clopidogrel (monotherapy) in reducing the primary endpoint - a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke - in patients with PAD.

In the EUCLID study, symptomatic PAD patients who are 50 years of age or older will be randomized to receive either ticagrelor 90 mg twice daily or clopidogrel 75 mg once daily. Now that plans to initiate the study have been finalized, the EUCLID steering committee will begin the process of recruiting study investigators, clinical centers, and eventually patients.

by RTT Staff Writer

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