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Goodbye Supersize: New York City Board Of Health Approves Big Soda Ban Proposal

Goodbye Supersize: New York City Board Of Health Approves Big Soda Ban Proposal
9/14/2012 5:57 AM ET

As a historic and important step in fighting the epidemics of obesity and diabetes, New York City Board of Health on Thursday voted in favor of the policy of limiting the size of sugary beverages sold in food service establishments.

According to the big soda ban, proposed by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, sugary beverages with more than 25 calories per eight ounces can only be sold in portions of 16 ounces or less. Beverages with less than 25 calories per 8 ounces, more than 50 percent milk or 100 percent fruit or vegetable juice are not impacted by the new regulation.

The new regulation, which applies to restaurants, mobile food carts, delis and concessions at movie theaters, stadiums and arenas, is all set to go into effect on March 12, 2013 to give them six months to comply.

Barclays Center, in Brooklyn, New York, heralded as one of the ten most important sports stadiums in the world, which will open next week, will adopt the new sugary beverage plan, thus becoming the first major venue in the city to voluntarily comply with the new regulations, a first of its kind in the nation.

It's no secret that sodas and other sugary beverages are implicated in the obesity epidemic in the United States. Nearly 6,000 New Yorkers are estimated to die annually as a result of obesity and one in eight adult New Yorkers is said to have diabetes.

According to researchers, if consumers switched from sugary 32-ounce drinks to 16-ounce drinks, they would consume 63 fewer calories every time they bought a fast-food meal.

Commenting on the vote on the big soda ban, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said, "The Board of Health's passing this proposal means that New Yorkers will soon consume fewer junk calories and eventually begin turning the tide of the obesity epidemic that is destroying the health of far too many of our citizens".

Can the new regulation, limiting the size of sugary beverages, prove to be a turning point in the obesity epidemic?

by RTT Staff Writer

For comments and feedback: editorial@rttnews.com

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