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Sanofi's Lantus Insulin More Potent To Maintain Blood Sugar In Type 2 Diabetes

French drug giant Sanofi S.A. (SNY: Quote) on Friday said the new results from its Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention or ORIGIN trial showed that treatment with Lantus was approximately 3 times more likely to achieve and maintain blood sugar level in individuals with pre-diabetes or early type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk. Lantus or insulin glargine is a recombinant long acting human insulin analogue that can act up to 24 hours.

The results of ORIGIN trial showed that insulin glargine use was an independent predictor of maintaining mean yearly HbA1c < 6.5 percent target over 5 years, vs. standard care, the company noted. Similarly, a lower HbA1c baseline level was also found to predict reaching the same target.

The data was presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes or EASD 48th Annual Meeting.

ORIGIN is a unique, six-year landmark cardiovascular or CV outcomes trial, evaluating Lantus versus standard care in over 12,500 individuals who are at high CV risk with pre-diabetes or early type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Sanofi had reported key results earlier this year at the American Diabetes Association Congress that showed insulin glargine had a neutral effect on CV outcomes and significantly reduced progression from pre-diabetes to diabetes by 28 percent .

Professor Matthew Riddle, lead author of this ORIGIN sub-analysis, said, "This analysis shows that insulin glargine generally brought glycemic control to HbA1c <6.5 percent, a commonly sought target, and sustained it over 5 years. Further study of the ORIGIN data is likely to provide further insights regarding the medical benefits or risks of this approach to treatment."

The company now said its new findings showed that insulin glargine was more effective than standard care at maintaining blood sugar level in all subgroups assessed. Sanofi added that ORIGIN and its sub-studies assert insulin glargine as the most studied basal insulin with long-term proven efficacy and established safety. Its indication is for the treatment of diabetes where insulin use is required; it does not include people with pre-diabetes.

Riccardo Perfetti, vice president Medical Affairs, Global Diabetes, Sanofi, commented, "Contrary to conventional understanding that diabetes is a progressively worsening disease, these new results from this sub-study of ORIGIN suggest that achieving and maintaining glycemic control early with insulin glargine might positively affect the natural history of the disease."

Sanofi shares are currently trading at 68.56 euros in Paris, up 1.09 euros or 1.62 percent.

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by RTT Staff Writer

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