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U.S. Condemns Attacks, Killings In Iraq

The U.S. has condemned the large-scale militant attacks across Iraq that killed several dozens of people on the holiday of Eid al-Fitr. The state department said the "attacks were aimed at families celebrating the Eid al-Fitr holiday that marks the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan."

A statement from the U.S. Department of State, said "The terrorists who committed these acts are enemies of Islam and a shared enemy of the United States, Iraq, and the international community."

The death toll in the attacks across Iraq on Saturday has reportedly touched 80, with more than 150 injured in a spate of car bombs across the country -- most of which were centered around the capital Baghdad.

The series of car bombs took place even as Iraqis were out in large numbers at public places such as markets and restaurants to celebrate Eid al-Fitr which marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan. An official of the Iraqi Interior Ministry indicated at least eleven such attacks, with nine of them centered around Baghdad.

The U.S. blames the al Qaeda for the attacks, stating that they "bear the hallmarks of similar suicide and vehicle bomb attacks in Iraq over the past ninety days." The Department of State has squarely fixed the onus on al Qaeda in Iraq (AQI), led by Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. The U.S. Government considers al-Baghdadi a "Specially Designated Global Terrorist."

The U.S. has also offered a massive US$10 million in reward for "information that helps authorities kill or capture Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi." Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, also known as Abu D'ua, is now believed to be in Syria and has changed the name of AQI to the Islamic State of Iraq and Sham (ISIS).

by RTT Staff Writer

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