Health News


posttraumaticstress-062513.jpg

American males who join the armed forces are more likely to have suffered some trauma as children compared to those American males who do not serve their country, according to research conducted by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The study, published in JAMA Psychiatry, surveyed data on over 60,000 men and women who were interviewed with the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
More

healthcare-072414.jpg Health care workers holding an associate's degree currently make up the majority in the U.S. and that number is expected to climb, according to research conducted at the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program. The study notes that associate holding health care workers make up more than half of the health care workforce, a number that has risen 46 percent since 2000. oldman-072314.jpg Increases in life expectancy amongst older Americans may be slowing down, according to a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. For the study the researchers reviewed health from 1.4 million Medicare recipients dating back to 2008. "Living with multiple chronic diseases such as diabetes, kidney disease and heart failure is now the norm . . ." velo-071114.jpg Bicycling does not cause infertility, according to research conducted at University College London. The study, published in the Journal of Men's Health, surveyed data on 5,000 cyclists, who rode their bikes more than 8.5 hours per week. The team found that improvements in bicycle seats have rendered concerns over infertility baseless. More
confusedwomen-072314.jpg Some methods for hysterectomies may promote the spread of uterine cancer, according to a new study from researchers at the Columbia University Medical Center. For the study the researchers reviewed health records collected from over 500 hospitals including 232,882 hysterectomy patients. Some women undergo a specific form of hysterectomy called morecellation. Stressedwoman-071414.jpg Stress can slow women's metabolism leading to weight gain, according to research conducted at Ohio State University. The study, published in the journal Biological Psychiatry, assessed data on 58 women (average age 53), who were questioned on stress levels and fed an identical diet. kidney-012513.jpg Increases in climate temperature may lead to an increase in kidney stones, according to a new study from researchers at the Kidney Stone Center as well as the Hospital's Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness (CPCE) within the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). For the study the researchers linked weather patterns with fluctuations in kidney stone diagnoses between 2005 and 2011. More
letroz-071014.jpg

Breast Cancer Drug Shows Promise As Fertility Treatment



Letrozole (Femara), an aromatase inhibitor commonly used to treat breast cancer, has also shown promise as a fertility treatment, according to a new study from researchers at the Cleveland Clinic. For the study the researchers carried out a double blind test of the drug with 750 women between the ages of 18 and 40. The drug was compared to a commonly used estrogen receptor drug.
More
Acetaminophen-080513.jpg

Acetaminophen May Not Help Relieve Lower-Back Pain



Acetaminophen may not help treat lower-back pain, according to research conducted at the University of Sydney. The study, published in the journal the Lancet, collected data on over 1,600 people diagnosed with acute back pain. Researchers gave one group a placebo pill and another group acetaminophen and found that the latter offered no substantial pain relief compared to the former.
More
healthproblems-090913.jpg

Testosterone Supplements Not Linked With Heart Attack Risk



Testosterone supplements are unlikely to cause a spike in heart attack risk, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Texas. For the study the researchers reviewed health records from 25,000 older men charting any possible linkage between testosterone use and heart attack risk. They found no significant link between the supplement and cardiac risks.
More
AlzheimerAssociation-040611.jpg

Lifestyle Changes Key To Decreasing Alzheimer's Risk



Lifestyle changes hold the key to reducing Alzheimer's risk, according to research conducted at Cambridge University. The study, presented Sunday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Denmark, identified four key factors: eating healthy, exercising, managing obesity and staying mentally and socially engaged.
More
FREE Newsletters, Analysis & Alerts

 

Stay informed with our FREE daily Newsletters and real-time breaking News Alerts. Sign up to receive the latest information on business news, health, technology, biotech, market analysis, currency trading and more.