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Acetaminophen has long been used to control minor pains but it may also dull emotions, according to a new study from researchers at the Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. For the study the researchers enlisted 80 college students to take either a 1000mg dose of the drug or a placebo. Each of the study participants were then shown a series of photographs.
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Tylenol-040215.jpg Acetaminophen does not appear to help ease lower back pain and offers little relief for the most common form of arthritis, according to a new report. The report, published in the journal BMJ, analyzed data from 13 studies; 10 that examined the use of acetaminophen to treat osteoarthritis of the hip or knee, and three that assessed the use of the painkiller for lower back pain. imge1-032615.jpg Those with the highest levels of overall fitness at midlife may be at a lower risk to develop cancer later in life, according to a new study published in the Journal of the America Heart Association. The link was especially strong for men, who showed decreases in lung and colorectal cancers. For the study the researchers reviewed health records of just under 14,000 men between 1971 and 2009. imge1-032415.jpg Many acne patients routinely fail to take prescribed medications for the condition, according to a new study from researchers at the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. For the study the researchers examined the prescription usage of 143 acne patients. They found that 27 percent of the patients failed to obtain the medications that were prescribed as acne treatments. More
More U.S. teens are opting to use long-term forms of birth control, according to a new report. For the study, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers analyzed information from more than 7.5 million teens who sought contraception from family planning centers funded by a federal grant program known as Title X. smoke-032615.jpg Those who live in areas with higher degrees of smog in the air could be more likely to suffer from anxiety, according to a new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore, Maryland. For the study the researchers examined health records from 70,000 women across the U.S. Women who lived in the most air-polluted urban centers in the country were more likely to suffer anxiety. img3-031815.jpg France's government is likely to back a bill that will ban super-skinny fashion models on its catwalks, joining countries including Spain and Israel who have already passed similar legislation. The bill would require any potential model to undergo regular weight checks and maintain a body mass index of at least 18 (in which a 5-foot-7 woman would have to weigh at least 121 pounds). More

Sugar-Detecting MRI Could Aid In Cancer Detection



A new form of MRI technology that can detect sugar may help improve cancer detection and decrease the need for invasive procedures, according to a new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins. The new technology images not only uncover the proteins in potential tumors, but also the glucose surrounding those tumors to create more defined images.
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FDA Approves New Anthrax Drug



The FDA has issued its approval on a new drug aimed at treating the inhalation of anthrax. The new drug, called Anthrasil, is an antibacterial aimed specifically at anthrax and tested well in various clinical trials on animals. No human trials were conducted. Dr. Karen Midthun, director of the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, released a statement about the new drug approval.
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Rare Form Of Heart Attack May Be Hereditary



A rare form of heart attack known as spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) may be hereditary, according to a new study from researchers at the Mayo Clinic. This form of heart attack is most common in women and the researchers used data collected in their SCAD registry to detect possible familial ties with the condition.
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Antidepressants Linked To First-Time Seizures



A new study ties antidepressants to a higher risk for first-time seizures in people being treated for depression. The study, presented at the European Psychiatric Association (EPA) 23rd Congress, says that the kinds connected to the worse odds of having a first seizure were SSRIs, or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SNRIs, or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors and others.
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Swedishsnus-041315.jpg It is a universally accepted fact that no tobacco product is safe, and this warning message is made mandatory on all tobacco products. But Swedish Match AB, the largest manufacturer of chewing tobacco, which claims that its "Snus" presents substantially lower risks to health than cigarettes, has been seeking to revise the warning label on the product. More




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FDA Calendar
Event DateSymbolDrug NameEvent Name
07/05/2015VRTXLumacaftor / Ivacaftor comboFDA decision on Lumacaftor / Ivacaftor combo in people with CF ages 12 and older who have two copies of the F508del mutation
06/22/2015BMYOpdivo (BLA)FDA decision on Opdivo for the treatment of patients with advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer after prior therapy
05/27/2015SLXPXIFAXAN 550 mg tablets (sNDA)FDA decision on XIFAXAN for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea
05/27/2015AMGNCorlanor (NDA)FDA decision on Corlanor to treat heart failure
05/27/2015SLXPXIFAXAN (sNDA)FDA decision on XIFAXAN he treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea or IBS-D
05/13/2015KYTHATX-101 (NDA)FDA decision on ATX-101 for improvement in the appearance of moderate to severe submental fullness
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