Cancer

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letroz-071014.jpg Letrozole (Femara), an aromatase inhibitor commonly used to treat breast cancer, has also shown promise as a fertility treatment, according to a new study from researchers at the Cleveland Clinic. For the study the researchers carried out a double blind test of the drug with 750 women between the ages of 18 and 40. The drug was compared to a commonly used estrogen receptor drug.

VitaminD-010913.jpg Vitamin D obtained from sunshine may help the survival rates of those suffering from bowel cancer, breast cancer and lymphoma, according to research conducted at the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences. The meta study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, found that those who have higher levels of vitamin D when diagnosed typically have better survival rates.

dairy-062514.jpg Survivors of colon cancer may benefit from dairy rich diets, according to research conducted by the American Cancer Society. The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, surveyed data on 2,300 patients suffering from colon cancer who had been diagnosed between 1992 and 2009. Nine hundred forty nine of the study participants had died by 2010, with 408 dead of colon cancer.

soyfood-061914.jpg Soy based foods may not provide the relief for uterine cancer previously thought, according to a new study from researchers at the National Cancer Center in Tokyo. For the study the researchers collected data on diet, health and lifestyle from 49,000 Japanese women. Over the course of the study 112 of the women were diagnosed with uterine cancer.

TeenagersSmoking-081313.jpg Smoking and drinking is on the decline among U.S. teens, while texting while driving is increasing, according to the CDC. The government agency surveyed data on 13,000 teenagers to find that several kinds of unhealthy behavior (drug use, violence, risky sex) are less popular. "Overall, young people have more healthy behaviors than they did 20 years ago," said Dr. Stephanie Zaza at the CDC.

redmeat-061214.jpg Women who eat large quantities of red meat significantly increase their chances of getting breast cancer, according to research conducted at Harvard University. The study, published in the British Medical Journal, surveyed data on over 89,000 women over a 20-year period. Those women who ate 1.5 servings of red meat per day had a 22 percent higher risk of contracting breast cancer.