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Softdrink-042516.jpg Consuming sugary drinks could be linked with increased cancer risk, according to a new study from researchers at New York University. For the study the researchers collected data from 3,200 U.S. citizens over 20 years, reviewing their dietary information and cancer data. They found that men who routinely consumed sugary drinks were as much as three times more likely to develop prostate cancer.

sunglasses-lotion-041916.jpg Using an SPF 30 rated sunscreen may help prevent the deadliest forms of skin cancer, according to a new study from researchers at The Ohio State University. For the study the researchers examined a group of mice that were genetically predisposed to developing melanoma. They used an SPF 30 rated sunscreen on some of the mice and none on others.

Mammography-041916.jpg About half of U.S. women benefit from having mammograms before the age of 40, according to a new study from researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. For the study the researchers collected data from 900 women that were new patients in between 2011 and 2015. "We believe formal risk assessment is essential for women ages 40 to 44 . . ."

Nuts-041916.jpg Nutty about nuts - then you may be less prone to colon cancer. The supposition is being reported by Live Science, citing the findings presented at the American Association for Cancer Research's annual meeting on Monday. The new findings from South Korea suggest a reduction in colon cancer risk for both men and women.

spf30-sunscreens-041816.jpg A pre-clinical trial, using a mouse model, found that applying sun protection factor 30 or SPF30 sunscreen, prior to ultraviolet-B or UVB light exposure, will help delay melanoma. According to Ohio State University's Cancer Center, sunscreen before exposure to UVB light delayed melanoma onset in a mouse model of the disease.

metformintablets-041816.jpg The type of treatment for Type 2 diabetes may determine how likely diabetic women, who are past their menopausal stage, would survive, according to a study by the Roswell Park Cancer Institute. The joint study by Roswell Park and the University of Buffalo researchers found that Metformin, an oral medicine, which controls type 2 diabetes, could play a role in reducing the risk of dying from cancer

smoking-041116.jpg Those who smoke may be less likely to move into better quality jobs, according to a new study from researchers at Stanford University's Prevention Research Center in California. For the study the researchers followed the progress of 251 unemployed job-seekers over the course of a year. They found that over the course of that year 56 percent of the non-smokers found jobs.

weddingring-041216.jpg Married cancer patients may have better survival rates than single cancer patients, according to a new study from researchers at the Cancer Prevention Institute of California. For the study the researchers reviewed health records for 800,000 Californians diagnosed with invasive cancer between 2000 and 2009. They followed this data through 2012.

cigarrete-033016.jpg Though they are associated with having lower health risks, electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, generally cost more than conventional cigarettes, new research shows. For the study, published in the journal Tobacco Control, researchers compared the cost of combustible cigarettes to those for two major kinds of e-cigarettes.

Those who undergo head and neck scans following cancer treatment may be less likely to need surgery, according to a new study from researchers at the Institute of Head and Neck Studies and Education, or InHANSE, at the University of Birmingham. For the study the researchers looked at about 600 cancer patients, half of whom underwent Positron emission tomography-computed tomography, or PET-CT.

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