A new study suggests that the use of smokeless tobacco, or snus, may increase the risk of death in those with prostate cancer. The study, published in the International Journal of Cancer, found that those who used snus but did not smoke were three times more likely to die from prostate cancer than those who never used tobacco. For the study, researchers analyzed health check-up data.

Being obese may increase your risk of developing liver cancer, according to a new study. The study, published in the journal Cancer Research, examined data on 1.57 million adults from 14 U.S. studies to look for an association between obesity and type 2 diabetes and liver cancer. Researchers found that as the participants' BMI increased, so did their cancer risk.

mammogram-101416.jpg A new study is now questioning the validity of mammograms. However, cancer radiologist specialists cite that one study is unlikely to change standard guidelines. The Health Daily News reports, "Screening is much more likely to find insignificant breast tumors than it is to catch potentially life-threatening cancer in its early stages, a new study claims."

The FDA has issued up a warning that some forms of ovarian cancer tests may not be reliable. In a statement the agency has explained that several of the most reliable forms of screening are blood tests, but they may actually create spikes in the very biomarkers they are seeking. "Despite extensive research and published studies, there are currently no screening tests for ovarian cancer . . ."

ecigs-091516.jpg The rise of e-cigarettes may be increasing the rates at which people are quitting smoking, according to a new study from researchers at the U.K. Center for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies at the University of Nottingham. For the study, the researchers examined the prevalence of smoking in the U.K. between 2014 and 2015 and found as e-cigarettes increased in popularity, more people reported quitting.

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