Diet & Fitness

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Beer-030512_21Aug12.jpg Those who make the transition from moderate drinkers to problem drinkers may have their DNA to thank, according to research conducted at the University of California-San Francisco. The animal study, published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, isolated a protein - brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) - and tracked its relation to alcohol use disorder (AUD).

soda-102014.jpg Sugar speeds up the aging process as much as smoking, according to research conducted at the University of California at San Francisco. The study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, surveyed data on over 5,300 healthy Americans from a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

VitaminD-010913.jpg Vitamin D supplements may help kids with eczema, according to research conducted at the Health Sciences University of Mongolia. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, collected data on 107 Mongolian kids (aged 2-17) with atopic dermatitis (AD) that had flared up in cold weather.

sportsdrink-101514.jpg Athletes who consume sports drinks may be at a high risk of poor oral health, according to research conducted at the University College London. The study, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, surveyed data on 39 published studies on the oral health of elite athletes. "Oral health could be an easy win for athletes, as the oral conditions that can affect performance . . ."

diet-022513.jpg The Mediterranean diet, rich in whole grains, fruits, beans, fish and olive oil, may help reverse metabolic syndrome, according to research conducted at the Hospital Universitari de Sant Joan de Reus, in Spain. The study, published in CMAJ, surveyed the effects of the Mediterranean diet on metabolic syndrome, which is characterized by a collection of risk factors for heart disease.

pickyeater-101514.jpg Eating disorders may start in elementary school, according to research conducted at the University of Montreal. The study, presented at a meeting of the Eating Disorders Association of Canada in Vancouver, surveyed data on 215 kids (ages 8-12) with eating problems. The research team found that over 15 percent made themselves vomit from time to time and 52 percent had been hospitalized.

familymeal-101414.jpg Enjoying calm and positive family meal times can help manage childrens' weight and prevent childhood obesity. Researchers examined recordings of the mealtimes of 120 families with children between the ages of 6 and 12, tracking the length of meals, the type of food served, and the way that family members related to each other during the meal.

coffee-022113.jpg Those who drink decaf coffee may enjoy improved liver function, according to a new study from researchers at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. For the study the researchers reviewed health records from 28,000 American adults aged 20 and older who provided details about their coffee consumption. "Our findings link total and decaffeinated coffee intake to lower liver enzyme levels."

Food-101014.jpg On average chain restaurants across the U.S. are cutting calories, according to research conducted at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, surveyed menu items from 66 of the nation's top 100 restaurants in 2012 and 2013. Newer, lower calorie items were found to contain an average of 60 fewer calories.

obesity-022412.jpg Obese children are likely to show early signs of heart trouble, according to research conducted at the University of Leipzig Heart Center in Germany. The study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, surveyed data collected on 101 kids (aged 9-16). One group was obese, while the other was not. The research team used two-dimensional echocardiograms with ultrasound.

athlets-101014.jpg MSRA, a strain of antibiotic resistant bacterium, is more prevalent in college athletes who participate in contact sports, according to research conducted at Vanderbilt University. The study, presented at IDWeek 2014, surveyed data collected on 377 athletes from 14 different teams at Vanderbilt. The athletes who played contact sports, like soccer and football, were twice as likely to carry MRSA.

coffee-022113.jpg Heavy coffee drinkers may be predisposed toward their caffeine cravings by their genes, according to research conducted at the Harvard School of Public Health. The study, published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, surveyed data on 120,000 regular coffee drinkers, finding six new gene variations linked to caffeine consumption.

VitaminD-010913.jpg High levels of vitamin D may not help prevent type 2 diabetes, according to research conducted at the University of Cambridge. The gene study, published in the journal Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, questioned results of previous studies that suggested a link between vitamin D deficiencies and diabetes.

soccer-093014.jpg Afterschool exercise programs for elementary school children may help increase thinking ability and fitness, according to research conducted at the University of Illinois. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, collected data on 221 kids (aged 7-9), who participated in a nine-month afterschool exercise program called FITKids.

MandM-092214.jpg Mars Inc. has announced a nationwide recall on its 3.4 oz. theater-sized M&Ms box. Certain boxes advertised as milk chocolate candy may contain the brand's Peanut Butter M&Ms instead. In a statement, Mars noted that the mislabeling may pose a threat to some. "People who have allergies to peanuts run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if their theater box . . ."