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migraine-111412.jpg Two new drugs - ALD403 and LY2951742 - may offer hope for those who suffer from migraines, according to research conducted at the University of California and Kings College London. The studies, presented at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting, calls the drugs' approach "preventative": "We've identified a new preventive treatment for migraines . . ."

Kids with irritable bowel syndrome [IBS] may be at a greater risk for celiac disease, according to research conducted at the University of Bari. The study, published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, assessed 782 children diagnosed with abdominal pain related disorders. Out of all the kids assessed, 270 had IBS, 201 had indigestion and 311 had functional abdominal pain.

VitaminD-010913.jpg Mothers with low levels of vitamin D may have kids at high risk for cavities later in life, according to research conducted at the University of Manitoba. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, measured levels of vitamin D in 207 pregnant women and then examined the teeth of 135 of their children when they were an average of 16 months old.

Autism-042412_04Jun12.jpg There is no link between induced labor and autism, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists [ACOG]. The report was intended to shoot down the claims of studies suggesting that existing guidelines on when and how labor should be induced or accelerated are false. In the opinion of the ACOG, limiting labor inductions could have negative effects on the health of women.

pinkribbon-121411_05Jun12.jpg False-positive mammograms do not deter women from getting screened in the future, according to research conducted at Dartmouth University. The study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, noted increased anxiety among those who get false positives but does not lead to antipathy toward the procedure. "Our study showed that anxiety from false-positive mammograms was temporary . . ."

tasteandsmell-042114.jpg Those who undergo the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery may experience changes in the senses of smell and taste, according to research conducted at the Leicester Royal Infirmary. The study, published in the journal Obesity Surgery, included 103 patients who had their stomachs made smaller and intestines shortened. The team had the participants fill out a questionnaire.

Chronicpain-102513.jpg Unusually low pain tolerance may actually be linked with a specific gene variant, according to a new study from researchers at independent firm Proove Biosciences. For the study researchers examined 2,700 chronic pain patients, looking specifically at a handful of genes. They focused on the genes COMT, DRD2, DRD1 and OPRK1, which have previously been associated with chronice pain.

confusedman-021313.jpg Chronic inflammation may increase the risk of prostate cancer, according to research conducted at Johns Hopkins University. The study, published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, surveyed data on 400 men who had biopsies taken along with inflammation levels. The team found that of the men found to have prostate cancer, 86% had signs of high inflammation.

Ragweed-Allergies-042114.jpg Ragwitek, a once-a-day tablet, has been approved by the FDA to treat allergies to ragweed in adults aged 18 to 65. The drug contains an extract from short ragweed pollen to treat short ragweed pollen induced allergic rhinitis (hay fever), with or without conjunctivitis (eye inflammation). "The approval of Ragwitek offers millions of adults living with ragweed pollen allergies . . ."

Free drug samples may be costly in the long run, according to a new study from researchers at Stanford. For the study the researchers worked with a team of dermatologists to see how free samples impact their prescribing practices. In 2010 they found that 18 percent of all prescriptions from the dermatologist group included a free sample of some drug.

child-091813.jpg The effects of childhood bullying may persist into adult years, according to research conducted at King's College London. The study, published by Beat Bullying, surveyed data collected on 7,771 kids whose parents detailed exposure to bullying. Bullying happened to roughly 28% of the children surveyed and had a negative physical and cognitive effect on that percentage of kids.

diabetes-041614.jpg The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's have approved a once-weekly injectable diabetes drug, Tanzeum. The FDA described Tanzeum (albiglutide) as a "glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, a hormone that helps normalize patients' blood sugar levels. Tanzeum "can be used alone or added to existing treatment regimens to control blood sugar levels in the overall management of diabetes."

AlzheimerAssociation-040611.jpg Women are nearly twice as susceptible to Alzheimer's disease in their 60's, according to new statistics from the Alzheimer's Association. A new study, published in the Annals of Neurology, found that a specific gene variant called ApoE4 substantially increases a woman's risk for Alzheimer's disease. Researchers analyzed the records of over 8,000 people who had been monitored over time.

ventilator-022014.jpg Sleep apnea may be linked to poor bone health, according to a new study which shows that people who suffer from the sleep disorder may be at an increased risk of developing osteoporosis. The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, shows that people with sleep apnea were 2.7 times more likely to be diagnosed with osteoporosis, especially women and older people.

Drowning deaths have decreased in the United States according to the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A new study conducted by the NCHS and published in the CDC's April edition of the NCHS Data Brief looked at the years 1999 through 2010. In all, more than 46,000 people died from unintentional drowning during that time.