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preemiefeet-021914.jpg Babies who are born pre-term may have an increased risk of developing blood clots later in life, according to a new study from researchers at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. For the study the researchers reviewed health records from roughly 3.5 million babies born in Sweden between 1973 and 2008. Out of those babies about 207,000 were born pre-term.

weightgain-072814.jpg Tonsillectomies, commonly prescribed to relieve sleep apnea in kids, may trigger weight loss gain, according to research conducted at Stanford University. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, surveyed data on 815 children who underwent the surgery. On average, the kids' weight rose over 6 percent within 18 months of their surgery, while their BMI rose an average of 8 percent.

posttraumaticstress-062513.jpg American males who join the armed forces are more likely to have suffered some trauma as children compared to those American males who do not serve their country, according to research conducted by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The study, published in JAMA Psychiatry, surveyed data on over 60,000 men and women who were interviewed with the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

obesity-022412.jpg Many obese kids may not have an accurate understanding of their own weight, according to a new study from researchers at the National Center for Health Statistics. For the study the researchers reviewed survey data collected from 6,100 kids between 2005 and 2012 as part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

hiv-treatment-011713.jpg Overall HIV diagnoses have gone down in the U.S. for all demographics except for gay males, according to a new study from researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The new data was released as part of a report on AIDs from the CDC's Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention. The report focused on data collected on U.S. citizens aged 13 and older between 2002 and 2011.

brain-101112.jpg Stroke incidence among seniors is down in the U.S., according to research conducted at Johns Hopkins University. The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, found that seniors (aged 65 and over) has been on the decline for 20 years. The research team surveyed data on nearly 15,000 individuals.

img1-071414.jpg The nickel surfaces of iPads may trigger allergic reactions in children, according to research conducted at the University of California, San Diego. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, noted the case of an 11-year-old who had an undiagnosed skin rash for six months. After getting skin patch testing, it was revealed that the boy had a nickel allergy.

velo-071114.jpg Bicycling does not cause infertility, according to research conducted at University College London. The study, published in the Journal of Men's Health, surveyed data on 5,000 cyclists, who rode their bikes more than 8.5 hours per week. The team found that improvements in bicycle seats have rendered concerns over infertility baseless.

kidney-012513.jpg Increases in climate temperature may lead to an increase in kidney stones, according to a new study from researchers at the Kidney Stone Center as well as the Hospital's Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness (CPCE) within the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). For the study the researchers linked weather patterns with fluctuations in kidney stone diagnoses between 2005 and 2011.

VitaminD-010913.jpg Vitamin D obtained from sunshine may help the survival rates of those suffering from bowel cancer, breast cancer and lymphoma, according to research conducted at the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences. The meta study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, found that those who have higher levels of vitamin D when diagnosed typically have better survival rates.

chip-070814.jpg A new birth control microchip may be ready to hit the U.S. marketplace as early as 2018, according to MicroCHIPS, an IT startup founded by researchers at MIT. The chip holds tiny reservoirs of the contraceptive drug levonorgestrel and releases an appropriate amount of the drug every day for up to 16 years.

gayparents-070714.jpg Children of same-sex couples tend to be happier and healthier than their peers, according to research conducted at the University of Melbourne. The study, published in the journal BMC Public Health, surveyed over 300 same-sex parents and their 500 children. The kids of same-sex couples tended to score higher on general health exams and on several measures of social well-being.

healthproblems-090913.jpg Testosterone supplements are unlikely to cause a spike in heart attack risk, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Texas. For the study the researchers reviewed health records from 25,000 older men charting any possible linkage between testosterone use and heart attack risk. They found no significant link between the supplement and cardiac risks.

hypodermicneedle-052812_10Jul12.jpg Vaccines against preventable diseases for children are safe, according to research conducted at Boston's Children's Hospital. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, analyzed data on 20,000 scientific titles and 67 papers on vaccine safety. The study found no link between the use of vaccines and autism in children, or between vaccines and childhood leukemia.

OrkutShutdown-070214.jpg Google will be putting to rest its first ever social network, Orkut, which failed to capture the popular imagination in U.S. as it did in countries like India and Brazil. In early 2004, when Google was looking to enter the social networking business and its $30 million bid for Friendster had been...