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A new controversial "three-parent baby" treatment may be available on the United Kingdoms National Health Service plan by next spring. The Daily Mail reports that "An independent panel of experts has cleared away remaining safety hurdles to recommend "cautious adoption" of mitochondrial replacement therapy (MRT) for devastating inherited diseases."

According to a new study released Monday, November 21, one in four children lack access to "essential primary and secondary health services." The study was based on analysis on national data of the Children's Health Fund's nationwide clinical treatment operations to assist uninsured or underinsured families. Currently more children have health coverage than any other time in United States.

President Obama has proposed a new rule that prevents the defunding of Planned Parenthood in some states for political reasons. The proposition would prevent states from withholding Title X federal family planning money from constituents for any reasons other than their provider's "ability to deliver services to program beneficiaries in an effective manner."

E-Cigarette-110916.jpg A new study shows that teens who "vape" e-cigarettes are more likely to move on to regular cigarettes. The survey was conducted over ten Los Angeles county schools. The study was published November 8 in the Journal of American Medical Association. Leading researcher Adam Leventhal cited that, "teens who vape frequently are more than twice as likely to start smoking on about a weekly basis."

A deadly complication related to measles may not be as rare as doctors once thought. The complication is fatal and incurable. At least 16 people in Los Angeles and San Francisco have died from it. The condition is called, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis or SSPE. Studies from the University of California cite that it is "caused when the measles virus stays in the brain, usually for years.

Preoxygenation-102616.jpg Preliminary research published in Health Daily News concludes that laughing gas (nitrous oxide) may not ease childbirth pain as much as once thought. The research finds that the majority of women who request laughing gas also ask for an epidural as well. Many countries, including the United States, often administer the laughing gas to mothers in labor to ease their pain.

A new study suggests that the use of smokeless tobacco, or snus, may increase the risk of death in those with prostate cancer. The study, published in the International Journal of Cancer, found that those who used snus but did not smoke were three times more likely to die from prostate cancer than those who never used tobacco. For the study, researchers analyzed health check-up data.

Newborn-Baby-Crying-101416.jpg Researchers find that multiple children's deaths could be linked to teething tablets. So far ten deaths have been linked to children using homeopathic teething tablets. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has also linked "400 adverse events" associated with the tablets. Parents with teething babies have been warned by the FDA to "stop using the products . . ."

ecigs-091516.jpg The rise of e-cigarettes may be increasing the rates at which people are quitting smoking, according to a new study from researchers at the U.K. Center for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies at the University of Nottingham. For the study, the researchers examined the prevalence of smoking in the U.K. between 2014 and 2015 and found as e-cigarettes increased in popularity, more people reported quitting.

Iris-left-eye-090816.jpg The Zika virus is capable of living in the eyes and possibly tears of humans, according to a new study from researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri. For the study the researchers collected data from a study of mice infected with Zika. "There were many different parts of the eye — the cornea, the iris, the retina."

MorningSunRays-082616.jpg Viral infections are potentially more dangerous when contracted in the morning hours, according to a new study from researchers in the U.K. And while the timing of catching a virus may not seem like a significant factor, it could make a serious difference, researchers say. "It's a big difference. The virus needs all the apparatus available at the right time . . ."

Fresh-meat-081016.jpg Those who routinely eat meat may have a higher overall risk of death as compared with those who don't eat meat, according to a new study from researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. For the study the researchers reviewed data collected as part of the Nurses' Health Study and the 26-year Health Professionals Follow-up Study at Harvard.

JapaneseRiceBread-080116.jpg Sensitivity to gluten in the diet may be the product of an immune response, according to a new study from researchers at Columbia University Medical Center in New York. For the study, the researchers collected data from 80 patients with non-celiac gluten or wheat sensitivity, or NCWS, 40 people with celiac disorder and 40 healthy patients.

Pink-ribbon-072116.jpg Women who undergo IVF pregnancy are at no greater risk of contracting breast cancer, according to researchers at Center for Human Reproduction at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, New York. The study collected health records from 25,000 women and found no "significant increase in the long-term risk of breast cancer among women treated with these IVF regimens."

WomanRedhead-071316.jpg Genes that are tied to red hair may also be linked to a higher risk of developing skin cancer, a new study says. The study, published in Nature Communications, saw researchers examine tumor DNA sequences collected from more than 400 people. There were 42 percent more mutations linked to sun damage in the tumors of those carrying the red hair gene variant than in those without that DNA.

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