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Kid's Health

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asthma1-071411.jpg Asthma may not be more common in the inner city as once thought, according to a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. For the study the researchers examined health records collected from 23,065 kids as part of the National Health Interview Survey. The researchers found that reported asthma attacks were not more common in the inner city.

kid-laptop-010614.jpg Children who have access to electronic devices in their bedrooms may get less sleep than children who do not, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Berkley. For the study the researchers examined data collected as part of an obesity study including fourth- and seventh-graders in Massachusetts.

children-with-diabities-122914.jpg Children with type 1 diabetes may experience delayed brain development, according to new study from researchers at Nemours Children's Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida. For the study the researchers performed brain scans on kids between four and nine years old. They found that compared to children without diabetes, those with the condition showed significantly slowed growth of grey matter.

fast-food-122214.jpg Eating fast food may result in lower test scores for students, according to research conducted at Ohio State University. The study, published in the journal Clinical Pediatrics, surveyed data on 8,544 middle school students. Eighth graders who ate fast food daily were behind those who ate no fast food by four points in reading, and three points behind in math.

SmogNY-121814.jpg Exposure to smog during pregnancy has been linked to a higher risk of autism in children, a new study suggests. Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health tracked 1,800 women who gave birth between 1990 and 2002, charting their exposure to air pollution during pregnancy. The study's results are published in the Environmental Health Perspectives journal.

marijuana-122012.jpg Teen marijuana use may be decreasing nationwide as more states legalize the drug for both medical and recreational use, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan and the National Institutes on Drug Abuse. For the study the researchers took a poll of 40,000 8th-graders, 10th-graders and 12th-graders.

depression-121614.jpg Antisocial behavior may be genetic, but some forms may also be triggered by environment, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Montreal and Uppsala University in Sweden. For the study, the researchers examined three different gene variants--MAOA, BDNF, and 5-HTTLPR. They found variants in each of the genes from kids that came from abusive environments.

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