Kid's Health

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fast-food-122214.jpg Eating fast food may result in lower test scores for students, according to research conducted at Ohio State University. The study, published in the journal Clinical Pediatrics, surveyed data on 8,544 middle school students. Eighth graders who ate fast food daily were behind those who ate no fast food by four points in reading, and three points behind in math.

SmogNY-121814.jpg Exposure to smog during pregnancy has been linked to a higher risk of autism in children, a new study suggests. Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health tracked 1,800 women who gave birth between 1990 and 2002, charting their exposure to air pollution during pregnancy. The study's results are published in the Environmental Health Perspectives journal.

marijuana-122012.jpg Teen marijuana use may be decreasing nationwide as more states legalize the drug for both medical and recreational use, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan and the National Institutes on Drug Abuse. For the study the researchers took a poll of 40,000 8th-graders, 10th-graders and 12th-graders.

depression-121614.jpg Antisocial behavior may be genetic, but some forms may also be triggered by environment, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Montreal and Uppsala University in Sweden. For the study, the researchers examined three different gene variants--MAOA, BDNF, and 5-HTTLPR. They found variants in each of the genes from kids that came from abusive environments.

obesity-022412.jpg Chronic lack of sleep and sleep-related breathing problems increase the risk of a child becoming obese by the age of 15, according to research conducted at Yeshiva University. The study, published in the Journal of Pediatrics, surveyed data on 2,000 kids obtained by questioning their parents on their sleep habits over a period of 6.75 years.

pregnant-090613.jpg The FDA has issued a new labeling system for pregnant women and their doctors, made to make the risks of prescription medicines clearer. According to the government agency, the new system will guard not only pregnant women but new mothers who are breastfeeding. "The new labeling rule provides for explanations, based on available information, about the potential benefits and risks for the mother.

Kickscooter-120114.jpg Foot-powered scooters cause more emergency room injuries to kids than any other toy, according to research conducted at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital. The study, published in the journal Clinical Pediatrics, looked at data on 3.3 million kids with toy-related injuries at ERs from 1990 to 2011.

Cribbedding-120114.jpg Despite risk of sudden infant death syndrome [SIDS], many U.S. babies are still bedded with dangerous materials like loose sheets and pillows, according to the CDC. The government agency first made recommendations against bedding infants with loose materials in the 1990s, leading to a decline in SIDS from 2000 to 2010.

crib-mattress-112014.jpg So-called smart baby monitors are not an effective means of prevention against sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), according to an editorial published in the British Medical Journal. David King, who wrote the editorial, says that the new wave of monitoring equipment is old ideas repackaged. "To older paediatricians this may sound familiar."

preemiefeet-021914.jpg Premature birth has now been confirmed as the leading cause of death amongst young children, according to a new study from researchers at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Death from complications of preterm birth accounted for roughly 1.1 million of the 6.3 million death of children under the age of five in 2013, according to the study.

obesity-022412.jpg Kids who are obese in youth often remain obese into adolescence, according to research conducted at Boston Children's Hospital. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, surveyed data on nearly 4,000 U.S. kids over a period of five years. The research team found that 83 percent of the kids who were obese in tenth grade were also obese in fifth grade.

img4-111014.jpg Regular availability of EpiPens in public school could save lives, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology in Atlanta. The pens are a delivery system for the drug epinephrine, which alleviates the symptoms of severe allergic reactions. For the study the researchers collected data on EpiPen use in Chicago Public Schools.

img3-111014.jpg Laundry detergent "pods" may pose a significant poisoning risk to children, according to a new study from researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. For the study the researchers reviewed records collected by poisoning centers across the U.S. between 2012 and 2013.

Schoollunch-111014.jpg A new study from the FDA has revealed that public school lunches may be growing healthier as a result of stricter health guidelines. The research was conducted at Virginia Tech University and surveyed the health content of 1,300 packed and provided school lunches at three rural Virginia schools. The research team notes that about 40 percent of public school parents pack lunches for their kids.