Kid's Health

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preemiefeet-021914.jpg Babies who are born pre-term may have an increased risk of developing blood clots later in life, according to a new study from researchers at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. For the study the researchers reviewed health records from roughly 3.5 million babies born in Sweden between 1973 and 2008. Out of those babies about 207,000 were born pre-term.

weightgain-072814.jpg Tonsillectomies, commonly prescribed to relieve sleep apnea in kids, may trigger weight loss gain, according to research conducted at Stanford University. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, surveyed data on 815 children who underwent the surgery. On average, the kids' weight rose over 6 percent within 18 months of their surgery, while their BMI rose an average of 8 percent.

children-072414.jpg Children and adolescents who lose a parent may suffer higher mortality rates than those children and adolescents who are unaffected by parental death, according to research conducted at Aarhus University. The study, published in PLOS Medicine, found a 50 percent greater risk of mortality in kids (aged six months to 18 years) who lost a parent.

musculararm-072314.jpg Growth hormones may be increasingly more common for use amongst U.S. teens, according to a new study from the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. According to the report, 11 percent of teens responded to a survey claiming that they had previously used human growth hormones as a performance enhancing drug. This is a sudden spike in reported usage from the last survey in 2012.

obesity-022412.jpg Many obese kids may not have an accurate understanding of their own weight, according to a new study from researchers at the National Center for Health Statistics. For the study the researchers reviewed survey data collected from 6,100 kids between 2005 and 2012 as part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

freshfruitsvegetables-030514.jpg Over 75 percent of American kids are eating fruit every day, while 92 percent eat vegetables in the same time frame, according to research conducted by the CDC. The study, published in the NCHS Data Brief, also showed that intake levels declined as kids got older. Researchers surveyed data on kids aged 2-19 finding that 90 percent of kids aged 2-5 ate fruit everyday.

sleepingbaby-071414.jpg Sleep-related deaths in infants are most likely to be caused by bed sharing with others, according to research conducted by the CDC. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, assessed sleep-related deaths from 24 states during the time span of 2004-2012. About 70 percent of the deaths occurred while infants shared "the same surface with a person or animal."

img1-071414.jpg The nickel surfaces of iPads may trigger allergic reactions in children, according to research conducted at the University of California, San Diego. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, noted the case of an 11-year-old who had an undiagnosed skin rash for six months. After getting skin patch testing, it was revealed that the boy had a nickel allergy.

Overscheduledkid-070914.jpg Children who are able to choose free time activities may grow up to have better self direction than kids whose free time is more structured, according to research conducted at the University of Colorado. The study, published in the journal Frontiers of Psychology, surveyed data on 70 kids (aged 6) whose parents recorded their daily activities.

img1-070914.jpg First time mothers who had their infants visited by nurses were less likely to see the children die, according to research conducted at the University of Rochester. The study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, surveyed data on 1,138 mothers in the impoverished neighborhoods of Memphis, Tennessee. The women were divided into four treatment groups.

Beer-030512_21Aug12.jpg A new test may be able to accurately predict which teens are at risk to become binge drinkers, according to research conducted at the University of Vermont. The study, published in the journal Nature, predicted with 70 percent accuracy results for a group of 2,400 European teenagers followed for a five-year period (from the age of 14 to 19).

gayparents-070714.jpg Children of same-sex couples tend to be happier and healthier than their peers, according to research conducted at the University of Melbourne. The study, published in the journal BMC Public Health, surveyed over 300 same-sex parents and their 500 children. The kids of same-sex couples tended to score higher on general health exams and on several measures of social well-being.

BlueHookah-070714.jpg Hookah use is on the rise among high school seniors, according to research conducted at New York University. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, surveyed 5,540 students, finding that one in five reported using the tobacco pipe. "What we find most interesting is that students of higher socioeconomic status appear to be more likely to use hookah," said Joseph J. Palamar.

hypodermicneedle-052812_10Jul12.jpg Vaccines against preventable diseases for children are safe, according to research conducted at Boston's Children's Hospital. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, analyzed data on 20,000 scientific titles and 67 papers on vaccine safety. The study found no link between the use of vaccines and autism in children, or between vaccines and childhood leukemia.

infant-043013.jpg Medications used to numb the gums of teething babies could be hazardous to their health, according to a news study from researchers at the Food and Drug Administration. The agency has released a new guideline recommending that such drugs, including viscous lidocaine, or benzocaine-containing teething products, are never to be used on teething babies.