Men's Health

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scratching-103014.jpg A new study has found out why scratching an itch can make the itch stronger. Researchers at Washington University's Center for the Study of Itch examined serotonin levels in mice and found that scratching an itch produces pain signals that disrupt nerves from carrying itch signals. The itch signals trigger serotonin to be released to control the pain.

diabetestuberculosis-102914.jpg Health experts warn that a rise in diabetes cases worldwide may result in a rise in tuberculosis. Anthony Harries of the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease told Reuters that his organization is raising the alarm so "that we don't watch history repeat itself with TB-diabetes." Those who have diabetes are at a greater risk to get sick from a latent TB infection.

ebola-102014.jpg All travelers who return from the West African countries plagued by the Ebola virus will be tracked by U.S. health officials. The program, which requires affected parties to have their temperature checked twice daily and report to a local public health department, applies to those who return to the country from Liberia, Guinea or Sierra Leone.

testosterone-101314.jpg The FDA has ruled that there is a lack of evidence to prove that testosterone replacement therapy is effective in treating reduced testosterone levels in aging men. The agency says that use must be more strictly regulated, while ordering further tests on the risk of heart attack and stroke. Over the summer, the FDA required testosterone replacement therapy makers to include a general warning.

oldman-072314.jpg Life expectancy in the U.S. reached a record high in 2012, according to research conducted by the CDC. The report found that compared to 2011 to 2012 the life expectancy at birth increased from 78.7 years to 78.8 years. For women, the life expectancy stood at 81.2 years, while men would average a life span of 76.4 years. The 4.8 year difference is the same as that reported in 2011.

texting-100714.jpg Teens who send sexually oriented texts, or sexts, may experience a greater likelihood of engaging in sexual activity, according to research conducted at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, surveyed data on an ethnically diverse group of adolescent students from Southeast Texas over a six-year period.

pills-051914.jpg New research shows that those who abuse painkillers are not properly prepared to handle an overdose. The research, published their findings in a recent issue of the International Journal of Drug Policy, showed that most narcotic abusers are unaware of their options. The study featured in-depth interviews among 46 users aged 18 to 32. All were residents of New York City.

acupuncture-100214.jpg Acupuncture may not be effective in treating chronic knee pain, a new study finds. Researchers studied the effects of administering either needle acupuncture, laser acupuncture, and sham laser and compared it to patients receiving no treatment at all for knee pain. They found that, among the 300 study participants, the patients receiving any kind of acupuncture reported the same reduction.

ventilator-022014.jpg Those with abnormally large tongues may be at a higher risk for developing sleep apnea, according to research conducted at the University of Pennsylvania. The study published in the journal Sleep, collected data on 90 obese adults with sleep apnea and 31 obese adults without the disorder. Obese participants with sleep apnea had significantly greater tongue volumes.

asthma1-071411.jpg Fear of job loss may increase the risk factor of developing asthma, according to research conducted at the Germany's Düsseldorf University Hospital.

flushot-091914.jpg CDC officials are urging people to get their flu shots. Lyn Finelli, CDC's chief of influenza surveillance and outbreak response in the Influenza Division, says the normal way of thinking is that flu isn't really that serious because people don't know 20,000 people died last year from influenza. She adds that flu victims usually don't know for a while they are sick.

marijuana-122012.jpg New statistics show that 1 in 10 Americans have gone to work while high on marijuana. A joint poll from Mashable.com and SurveyMonkey of 534 Americans found that about 9.7 percent of U.S. workers have gone to work after smoking weed. Some 81 percent of those bought the drug illegally, the poll found. Those people did not purchase the marijuana in Colorado or Washington.

erectiledysfunction-091814.jpg The FDA has issued its approval to a new fast-acting erectile dysfunction drug from Vivus and Auxilium. The new drug is called Stendra (avanafil) and marks the first ED drug approved by the FDA that can be taken approximately 15 minutes before sexual activity. Wayne JG Hellstrom says it could provide a viable new option to ED patients.

artificialsweetner-091914.jpg Routine use of artificial sweeteners may be linked with increased diabetes risk, according to a new study from researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. For the study the researchers conducted experiments on the gut microbes found in both humans and mice. They examined the effects of artificial sweeteners including aspartame, sucralose and saccharine.