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BillGates-CuringAlzheimers-111317.jpg Billionaire and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates is making a personal investment of $50 million into the Dementia Discovery Fund, a venture capital fund that invests in projects and companies to develop treatments for the brain-wasting disease. The investment is not part of Gates' philanthropic Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which has focused primarily on infectious diseases.

Slide0-Alzheimers-081717.jpg The development of Alzheimer's drugs has been marred by a high failure rate. A U.S. study, which analyzed how the Alzheimer's clinical trials fared during the period of 2002 to 2012, revealed a failure rate of 99.6% compared to a failure rate of 81% for cancer drugs.

Aerobic-exercise-120116.jpg Older adults who suffer from dementia, or mild cognitive impairment, may benefit from aerobic exercise, according to a new study. The study, to be presented Wednesday at the Radiological Society of North America, included 16 people with an average age of 63, who did aerobic workouts on a treadmill, stationary bike or elliptical training. They worked out four times a week for six months.

PTSD-120116.jpg The Food and Drug Administration has given permission for large-scale, Phase 3 clinical trials of MDMA— a final step before the possible approval of ecstasy as a prescription drug to treat posttraumatic stress disorder. The New York Times uses the example of an American soldier, C.J. Hardin who served in both Iraq and Afghanistan. Hardin tried all available methods of treating PTSD.

A new study finds that men with sexist ideologies are more likely to suffer from psychological and mental health issues. The Washington Post reported on a study published November 21 in the Journal of Counseling Psychology. The report analyzes 78 case studies on masculinity and mental health between 2003 and 2013. The participants range from ages 12 to over 65.

The rates of dementia in the U.S. have fallen by 24 percent, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan. For the study the researchers collected data from more than 21,000 senior citizens over the last decade. They found that dementia rates in those over the age of 65 dropped for 11.6 percent in 2000 to 8.8 percent in 2012.

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