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A new controversial "three-parent baby" treatment may be available on the United Kingdoms National Health Service plan by next spring. The Daily Mail reports that "An independent panel of experts has cleared away remaining safety hurdles to recommend "cautious adoption" of mitochondrial replacement therapy (MRT) for devastating inherited diseases."

tomato-112116.jpg Women who engage in yo-yo dieting may face a greater risk of heart disease, such as coronary heart disease and sudden cardiac death, according to a new study. The study, presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016, featured 158,063 postmenopausal women split into four categories: stable weight, steady gain, maintained weight loss, and weight cycling.

President Obama has proposed a new rule that prevents the defunding of Planned Parenthood in some states for political reasons. The proposition would prevent states from withholding Title X federal family planning money from constituents for any reasons other than their provider's "ability to deliver services to program beneficiaries in an effective manner."

The likelihood of individuals contracting the flu may be directly linked with the year of their birth, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Arizona. For the study the researchers examined the exposure to certain strains of the flu virus during a child's early life. "But as far as the data tell us, there is something kind of magical about the first time . . ."

Vacutainer-blood-bottles-102616.jpg A new Canadian study finds that when it comes to blood transfusions, fresher blood is not any better than older blood. Nancy Heddle is a professor emeritus of medicine at McMaster University, in Hamilton, Ontario. Heddle cites, "Our study provides strong evidence that transfusion of fresh blood does not improve patient outcomes, and this should reassure clinicians that fresher is not better."

Preoxygenation-102616.jpg Preliminary research published in Health Daily News concludes that laughing gas (nitrous oxide) may not ease childbirth pain as much as once thought. The research finds that the majority of women who request laughing gas also ask for an epidural as well. Many countries, including the United States, often administer the laughing gas to mothers in labor to ease their pain.

alcohol-glass-102616.jpg Women in the U.S. are reportedly catching up to men in terms of alcohol consumption, according to researchers at the National Drug and Alcohol Research Center at the University of New South Wales in Australia. The researchers found that men born between the years 1891 and 1910 drank as much as three times as women, but those born between 1991 and 2000 drank only 1.2 times more than women.

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