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Trapeziumbone-061615.jpg A new bone density treatment is showing promise in the fight against osteoporosis, according to researchers from the Translational Research Institute at Scripps Florida. Their study focused specifically on a protein called PPARG which impacts bone marrow stem cells. The researchers created a new compound to mimic the PPARG protein and introduced it to bone marrow stem cells.

baby2-061115.jpg A woman has successfully given birth to a child after receiving an ovary tissue transplant of tissue frozen from her own body during childhood. The woman, who elected to freeze some ovary material before a surgical procedure as a child, has proven the transplant could provide new fertility options for some women, according to researchers at Oxford University.

Electronic-cigarettes-060915.jpg Many e-cigarette users believe that using the devices will help them quit smoking, according to a new French survey. The study, presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago, finds that about 69 percent of e-cigarette users believe the devices can help a person quit tobacco smoking, compared with just 31 percent of the general population.

img2-060815.jpg Researchers have found that migraine patterns may change during pregnancy in women who suffer from migraines. The researchers from the American Migraine Foundation noted in a news release that women, especially those who have menstrual-related migraines, may have fewer attacks during pregnancy. Dr. Dodick noted that some women with a history of migraines may experience more severe attacks.

Youngcoupleembracing-060515.jpg A committee of medical advisors is considering whether or not to recommend that the Food and Drug Administration approve "the little pink pill," known by its generic name, flibanserin, and commonly called the female Viagra, the first drug that aims to boost a woman's libido. The FDA has twice before rejected the drug after previous advisory panels concluded there were questions about its safety.

Researchers say that eating the placenta after giving birth has no real medical benefit to new mothers. In the study review, a team of researchers at Northwestern University examined 10 published studies on the benefits of eating the placenta after giving birth. They found that the studies did not support health claims of increased milk production or easing of postpartum depression.

Pinkribbon-060515.jpg Women who undergo mammography screening reduce their risk of dying from breast cancer by up to 40 percent, according to a new international study. The study, included in the New England Journal of Medicine, shows that by simply inviting a woman to undergo a mammography reduced her risk of death from breast cancer by 23 percent. The study was conducted by experts from 16 countries.

Contactlens-060215.jpg Using contact lenses may increase the risk of foreign bacteria spreading within the eye, according to a new study from researchers at NYU's Langone School of Medicine. For the study the researchers collected swab samples from nine contact lens users and 11 non-users. They then analyzed the microbe content of all the samples.

legplaster-052715.jpg Those who suffer from subclinical hyperthyroidism may be at an increased risk for fractured hips and spines, according to a new study from researchers at Bern University in Switzerland. For the study the researchers reviewed health records of 70,298 volunteers, 4,092 (5.8 percent) of whom had subclinical hypothyroidism and 2,219 (3.2 percent) had subclinical hyperthyroidism.

Many freshman female students have experienced at least some type of rape, according to a new study. The study, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, looked at 483 women who were a representative sample of the freshman class and who volunteered to partake in the study. The women filled out questionnaires when they arrived on campus and at the end of their fall semester.

Pregnantwoman-052215.jpg Pregnant women should limit the use of paracetamol, as long-term use of the painkiller could affect the reproductive health of their sons, a new study suggests. For the study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, scientists engineered a system to mimic the conditions of human pregnancy as closely as possible.

Pinkribbon-052215.jpg Breast density may not necessarily indicate greater risk of developing breast cancer, according to a new study from researchers at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. For the study the researchers examined health records from 365,426 women aged 40 to 74 years who had 831,455 total digital mammograms.

texting-100714.jpg Looking hot today? It might not matter. If the person you are trying to attract has a low sex drive, it may be difficult to grab their attention, no matter how much you primp or preen.

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