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Nevada Bans Employers From Rejecting Job Applicants Over Marijuana Use

Nevada has become the first state to ban employers from rejecting a job applicant because of a failed marijuana test.

The new law signed by Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak earlier in June makes it illegal for employers to reject job applicants based on the results of a marijuana screening test. The law will go into effect on January 1, 2020.

According to the new law, "It is unlawful for any employer in this State to fail or refuse to hire a prospective employee because the prospective employee submitted to a screening test and the results of the screening test indicate the presence of marijuana."

In addition, the law states that workers who fail a drug test during their first month at the job will have the right to challenge the finding by submitting to a second screening test at their own expense.

However, the law will not apply to people applying for jobs such as firefighters, public safety positions like emergency medical technicians, and jobs in the transportation sector.

Cannabis in Nevada became legal for recreational use, effective January 1, 2017.

Nevada is currently one of thirty one states, along with the District of Columbia, that have legalized recreational or medical cannabis. However, the use of marijuana remains illegal on the federal level.

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