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Atlas Air Prevails In Pilot Labor Arbitration; Union Ordered To Proceed In Talks

Atlas Air Worldwide Holdings Inc. (AAWW) confirmed Tuesday that its subsidiary, Atlas Air Inc, prevailed in an arbitration between Atlas Air and the union that represents its pilots, the Airline Professionals Association, Teamsters Local 1224.

On Monday, the arbitrators ordered the Union to now proceed with contractually required negotiations for a new joint collective bargaining agreement in connection with Atlas Air's acquisition of Southern Air in April 2016.

The Union also is required to submit an integrated seniority list of Atlas Air and Southern Air pilots to the company within 45 days, followed by a period of bargaining, after which any unresolved issues would be submitted to timely, interest-based arbitration.

Atlas Air Worldwide stated that the arbitration decision also affirmed Atlas Air's long-standing position that the Union has been in violation of the existing collective bargaining agreement by refusing to follow the merger provisions for a new joint collective bargaining agreement, and by failing to present an integrated pilot seniority list to the Company.

The Union was also found to be in violation of the Southern Air CBA for refusing to follow the merger provisions for the joint collective bargaining agreement on behalf of the Southern Air pilots.

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