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Whole Foods To Cut Health-Care Benefits For 1,900 Part-time Workers

Amazon.com (AMZN) owned Whole Foods is reportedly withdrawing medical benefits for hundreds of its part-time workers starting January 1, 2020.

According to Business Insider, the changes will affect less than 2%, or 1,900 employees, of Whole Foods' workforce. Previously, employees needed to work at least 20 hours a week to qualify for the health-care plan. Now they will need to work at least 30 hours.

"In order to better meet the needs of our business and create a more equitable and efficient scheduling model, we are moving to a single-tier part-time structure," a company spokesperson said in an email.

"We are providing Team Members with resources to find alternative healthcare coverage options, or to explore full-time, healthcare-eligible positions starting at 30 hours per week. All Whole Foods Market Team Members continue to receive employment benefits including a 20% in-store discount."

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