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Microsoft Beats Amazon To $10 Bln JEDI Contract

The U.S. Department of Defense awarded a $10 billion cloud computing contract to Microsoft Corp. (MSFT), which beat out larger rival Amazon.com (AMZN).

After the initial review process, only Amazon and Microsoft were determined to meet the minimum technical requirements necessary to be part of the final round of consideration.

The 10-year Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure JEDI Cloud contract is making the US Defense department more technologically agile.

Amazon said, "We're surprised about this conclusion. AWS is the clear leader in cloud computing, and a detailed assessment purely on the comparative offerings clearly led to a different conclusion..."

Amazon is reportedly evaluating its options after the decision, and it has 10 days to decide whether or not to launch a challenge in the courts.

Donald Trump has repeatedly criticized Amazon and its founder Jeff Bezos, who also owns the Washington Post newspaper in the past.

In Monday regular trade, MSFT is currently trading at $144.32, up $3.59 or 2.55 percent.

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