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NY Regulator Investigates Goldman Sachs' Apple Card For Alleged Gender Bias

The New York Department of Financial Services has opened an investigation into claims the Apple Card, which is administered by Goldman Sachs, offered different credit limits for men and women.

The investigation follows complaints - including from Apple's co-founder Steve Wozniak - that algorithms used to set limits might be inherently biased against women.

The tech entrepreneur David Heinmeier Hansson twitted that Apple Card offered him twenty times the credit limit as his wife, although they have shared assets and she has a higher credit score. Hansson also twitted that after reaching out to Apple in an attempt to rectify the situation, he was told credit limits are determined by an algorithm.

The New York Department of Financial Services said in a statement that it "will be conducting an investigation to determine whether New York law was violated and ensure all consumers are treated equally regardless of sex. Any algorithm that intentionally or not results in discriminatory treatment of women or any other protected class violates New York law."

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