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BMW, Google, Samsung SDI And Volvo Commit Not To Use Deep-ocean Minerals To Protect Deep Seas

BMW Group said it has launched an initiative to protect the deep seas in cooperation with a World Wildlife Fund. Google, Samsung SDI and Volvo Group have already joined the initiative to protect the deep seas.

The companies commit not to use deep-ocean minerals or finance deep-sea mining until comprehensive scientific research into the impact of deep-sea mining can be conducted and the consequences for the environment are clearly assessed.

BMW said that deep-sea deposits of mineral raw materials have recently received greater public attention, due to growing demand for raw materials in general.

The company noted that Manganese nodules, cobalt-rich iron and manganese crusts, as well as massive sulphides and ore sludge, could attract the interest of mining companies. Individual experts believe this could offer an attractive alternative to minerals from terrestrial mining. However, the majority of experts remain sceptical overall, due to the lack of scientific analysis.

Those are the key materials commonly used to make batteries.

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