Heart Health

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salt-021213.jpg The U.K. sponsored a nationwide salt reduction campaign that turned out beneficial to those who partook, according to research conducted by the Action on Salt working group. The study, published in the British Medical Journal, surveyed data on over 31,500 people participating in the Health Survey for England between 2003 to 2011.

PrescriptionPills-041014.jpg Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs] have been linked to a heart condition called atrial fibrillation, according to research conducted at the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam. The study, published in BMJ Open, found that the risk for atrial fibrillation may increase up to 84% for those taking NSAIDs. Atrial fibrillation causes the upper chambers of the heart to beat irregularly.

Those who eat beans may be at a lesser risk of heart disease than those who do not, according to research conducted at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. The study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, noted that beans, peas or lentils can significantly reduce "bad cholesterol" and therefore the risk of cardiovascular disease.

fruitveggies-040314.jpg The more fresh produce and fruit you daily, the lower your risk of death at any age is, according to a new study. Researchers of the study, published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, analyzed the eating habits of over 65,000 people in England between 2001 and 2013. Those who ate seven or more portions of fresh fruits and vegetables a day had a 42 percent lower risk of death.

Time-change-033114.jpg Decreased sleep owing to daylight savings switch is to blame for increased heart attack risk, according to research conducted at the University of Colorado. The study, delivered at the recent scientific sessions of the American College of Cardiology in Washington, included data on 42,000 hospital admissions in Michigan.

underweight-033114.jpg Those who are underweight may be at greater risk than those who are overweight, according to research conducted at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. The study, published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health, surveyed 51 studies on the links between BMI and deaths from any cause.

healthproblems-090913.jpg Those who are married may be at a lesser risk of cardiovascular disease, according to research conducted at the NYU Langone Medical Center. The study, recently presented at the session of the American College of Cardiology, analyzed data on more than 3.5 million men and women from 20,000 U.S. heath centers. Researchers note that married people had a 5% decreased risk of cardiovascular diseases.

Training for a marathon may lower risk of heart disease, according to new research to be presented at the upcoming American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Researchers used 45 recreational male runners planning to run the 2013 Boston Marathon for an 18-week training program.

lady-031814.jpg Certain weight loss surgeries can help to reduce the risk of heart attacks and deaths among those who are obese, according to a new study. Researchers of the study, published March 28 in the International Journal of Cardiology, have said that their findings suggest obese people at high risk for heart disease should seriously consider undergoing this type of procedure to lose weight.

lady-031814.jpg Women may routinely experience delays in receiving care for cardiac events as compared with their male counterparts, according to a new study from researchers at the McGill University Medical Center in Montreal. For the study the researchers reviewed records from 1,100 adults under the age of 55, all of whom received care for heart attacks or angina.

fishoil-031814.jpg Diets high in omega-3 fish oils may not, in fact, decrease the risk of heart disease according to a new study from researchers at the Department of Public Health and Primary Care at the University of Cambridge in the U.K. For the study the researchers examined 72 previous studies encompassing health records from over 600,000 people.

strokes-021314.jpg Slightly higher than average blood pressure may result in an increased incidence of stroke, according to research conducted at Southern Medical University in Guangzhou, China. The study, published in the journal Neurology, surveyed data on 19 previous studies focused on stroke risk in those with prehypertension.

trafficpollution-031014.jpg Prolonged exposure to highway traffic may actually alter the structure of the human heart, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. For the study the researchers performed MRIs on 3,896 people who showed no signs of cardiovascular illness before the study.

obesity-022412.jpg Obese adolescents who suffer from inadequate levels of sleep may be at an increased risk for heart disease, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Health System and Baylor University. For the study, the researchers followed the development of 37 obese teens between the ages of 11 and 17. They specifically reviewed the physical indicators for heart disease.

healthproblems-090913.jpg Having an angry outburst may raise the risk of heart attack, according to research conducted at Harvard University. The study, published in the European Journal, notes that high levels of stress create a reaction including increases in heart rate and blood pressure. The team surveyed nine studies conducted from 1966 to 2013 including 4,500 cases of heart attack.