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Heart Health

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Coffee-012916.jpg Regularly consuming moderate amounts of caffeine is not linked with increased risk for heart palpitations, according to a new study from researchers at UC San Francisco. For the study the researchers collected data from 1,388 participants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) database. They tested the heart beats of heavy caffeine consumers over the course of one year.

Consuming more healthy fats may help decrease the risk of heart disease, according to a new study from researchers at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University in Boston. For the study the researchers reviewed dietary records from people in 186 countries throughout 2010. They found that of the 711,800 about ten percent of them all were heart related.

waterlootower-012016.jpg Those who live in high-rise apartments may be at higher mortality rates associated with cardiac arrest than those who live in other dwellings, according to a new study from researchers at the York Region Paramedic Services and Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. For the study the researchers examined health records from 7,842 heart attack patients.

Jogging-011316.jpg Exercise may significantly reduce the risk of heart disease for those with depression, according to a new study from researchers at the Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute in Atlana. For the study the researchers examined health records for over 1,000 people who were previously not diagnosed with heart disease or depression.

Nexium-Pills-011216.jpg Popular medicines for heartburn, indigestion and acid reflux, known as proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), can increase the chances of kidney disease, according to a new study. The study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, examined the medical records of two groups of people. Among the 322 people using PPIs in the ARIC study, the 10-year estimated absolute risk for chronic kidney disease.

cardiac-arrest-122815.jpg Some cardiac arrest patients may ignore simple warning signs, according to a new study from researchers in Oregon. For the study the researchers examined the warning signs that occur within the four weeks leading up to some sudden cardiac arrests (SCAs). They found that many patients either do not recognize or choose to ignore these symptoms, which include chest pains and shortness of breath.

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