Heart Health

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Racewalking-110613.jpg Taking a five-minute walk for each hour spent sitting may reverse damage to leg arteries and reduce the risk of heart disease, according to research conducted at Indiana University. The study, published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, surveyed data on 11 healthy men ages 20-35, who sat for three hours without moving their legs.

fruits-090414.jpg Eating fruit every day lowers the risk of getting heart and stroke problems by up to 40 percent, a new study suggests. The study, published in the European Heart Journal, found that the more fruit people ate, the more their risk of getting cardiovascular disease declined, and their blood pressure was lowered. Findings are based on a study of 451,682 people enrolled in a health study in China.

zumbadance-081914.jpg New research shows that high intensity workouts are safe for heart transplant patients. The study, released online in the American Journal of Transplantation, included 16 stable heart transplant patients who'd had their new heart for more than a year, who continued their recommended moderate workouts while others did high-intensity exercise.

heartbeat-081314.jpg The heart rhythms of those undergoing surgery could indicate potential stroke risk, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, San Francisco Medical School. For the study, the researchers reviewed health records of 1.7 million California residents that underwent inpatient surgery over a three-year period.

WomanExercising-052014.jpg More exercise isn't always better for people who have suffered and survived a heart attack. In a study published in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers studied the relationship between exercise and heart disease-related deaths in 2,400 active heart attack survivors over ten years. They found that increasing their exercise (in this study, walking and running) reduced their heart attack risk.