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Heart Health

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Women younger than the age of 55 are more likely to die from a heart attack, nearly twice as likely as men, because they are more likely to ignore tell-tale signs, according to a new study. For the study, published in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, researchers surveyed women ages 30 to 55 who were hospitalized for heart attack.

highgrovesauna-022415.jpg  Saunas may have health benefits for men, according to a new study. The study, published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, found researchers following more than 2,000 middle-aged men in eastern Finland for about 20 years. The more often the men went to the sauna, and the longer they stayed, the lower their risk for sudden cardiac death and fatal coronary heart disease.

Elderly-exercise-022015.jpg Even light exercise could lead to improvements in cardiac health for some senior citizens, according to researchers from the University of Florida Institute on Aging in Gainesville. For the study the researchers collected data from 1,170 senior citizens who have a mostly sedentary lifestyle. "These data are extremely concerning as older adults in the U.S. spend [about] 60% of their . . ."

green-red-foods-021315.jpg Obese children who consume a mostly plant-based diet are less likely to develop heart disease than those who consume other diets, according to a new study from researchers at the Cleveland Clinic. For the study the researchers followed 28 obese kids over the course of four weeks. Each of the children were between the ages of 9 and 18.

Girl-021015.jpg Heart attacks may take a more significant mental toll on women than it does on men, according to researchers at Yale. For the study the researchers collected data from 2,397 women and 1,175 men between the ages of 18 and 55, all of whom took part in the Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes of Young AMI Patients (VIRGO) study.

highcholesterol-052114.jpg Even slightly elevated levels of cholesterol in middle age could have a negative impact on heart health later in life, according to a new study from researchers at the Duke Clinical Research Institute in Durham, North Carolina. For the study the researchers examined health records from 1,478 adults who had not developed heart disease by the age of 55.

pneumonia-012215.jpg Older adults who suffer a bout of pneumonia could be at an increased risk for heart disease for years to come, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Pittsburgh. For the study the researchers examined health records from 6,000 people aged 65 and up who took part in the Cardiovascular Health Study and another 16,000 between 45 and 65.

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